Australia 2019 Pt IV: The Art & Architecture Of Melbourne

Having stayed in Melbourne for a combined total of about five months over multiple visits, sightseeing was not too high on my list of priorities for this trip. There were of course some places I wanted to revisit as well as some “new” sights.

 

On my last trip to Melbourne seven years ago I wandered around various lanes and alleyways like AC/DC Lane, Hosier Lane and Duckboard Place as the latter portrayed “London” in the fairly awful film ‘Queen Of The Damned‘ (2002). There was hardly a soul in sight back then. Admittedly there was far less graffiti (sorry, I mean street art!) but these areas, particularly Hosier Lane, have since gone on to become highly popular tourist sights crowded with people trying to get that perfectly cool Instagram shot. Not only that but even tour parties turn up as it’s included on walking tours of the city, probably because it’s not very far from Flinders Street Station.

            

Whilst those alleyways have only really taken off in the last few years in terms of popularity, the iconic beach boxes at Brighton (below) have long been famed for the various different art designs.

     

It was my third visit to this beach but the first time that it wasn’t cloudy or drizzling with rain. It was in fact a glorious day for the beach but sadly we only had about about 20 minutes there as we had to go somewhere else afterwards.

           

Back into the CBD and Federation Square (below) is next. This area didn’t even exist when I was first in Melbourne in 2001 but it was very noticeable when I next visited in 2007. It was actually built in 2002 and is home to some major cultural attractions, art galleries, restaurants and cafes.

     

Across the road from Federation Square is the iconic Flinders Street Station and behind that lies the main river which has the Yarra Footbridge crossing it in the near distance.

  

The next two places have a long, long history but I never really noticed them on previous trips to Melbourne. Before this trip I thought I’d better get a more modern view of things to do in the city so I thought I’d check out what local YouTubers recommended. A couple of the places (below) were far from new not that I was ever really aware of them. The first is the architecturally brilliant renaissance revival building of the former GPO (General Post Office) which is these days mostly occupied by Swedish fashion company H&M. The other is the Victoria State Library. The exterior was being renovated so I didn’t get to see that view but I did see the impressive inside whilst taking a break and chilling out for a bit. Oh and there’s free wifi inside too!

 

Although I visited Melbourne Museum (11 Nicholson Street, Carlton) back in 2001 I really couldn’t remember too much about it so I thought I’d go again, particularly as I had a discount coupon for the place! Sadly, I still don’t know too much more about the contents of it as I had to cut my stay short as it took longer than expected to get there and I then had to go and meet someone. In hindsight, I probably should have delayed my visit till I had more time but a short time on the ground floor only was better than not going at all.

     

Next to the Melbourne Museum is the Royal Exhibition Building (9 Nicholson Street, Carlton) which is a World Heritage Site-listed building dating back to the 19th century. It was completed in just 18 months, and just a short walk from there is the Parliament of Victoria (Macarthur Street) but sadly that was also having some repairs so I didn’t get to see the architecture in its full glory.

  

Newman College (887 Swanston Street, Parkville) was just a place I was passing when I was up near Melbourne General Cemetery in the Carlton North area. At the time I had no idea it was a college but was quite fascinated by it’s architecture.

 

The final half dozen photos below were mostly (but not all!) taken at a variety of different times and places during my various trips into central Melbourne.

        

Bonus: I’m partial to visiting sports grounds (eve when there’s no game on) and the bubble wrap-like Melbourne Rectangular Stadium (commercially known as AAMI Park) was one I really wanted to see due to it’s interesting architecture. It is the usual ground for Melbourne Victory home games although they played at the bigger Marvel Stadium when my nephew and I went to watch them.

 

Click here to read ‘Australia 2019 Pt V: Going Walkabout In The Wonderfully Named You Yangs’

About tokyofox

A Leicester City fan teaching English in Japan
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1 Response to Australia 2019 Pt IV: The Art & Architecture Of Melbourne

  1. Pingback: Australia 2019 Pt VII: Fun & Games With The Family | Tokyo Fox (東京狐)

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